Transcript - Humpty Doo Primary School video

<Voiceover>

Humpty Doo Primary School is located 40 km south of Darwin, in the rural area. The school has a diverse student population that reflects the multicultural diversity of the surrounding community. Approximately 15% of students identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, and 25% of students have Vietnamese, Thai, Filipino, Indonesian, Cambodian, Spanish, Dutch or Chinese language backgrounds. Humpty Doo Primary School commenced participation in the Smarter Schools National Partnerships, through the Maximising Improvements in Literacy and Numeracy initiative, under the Literacy and Numeracy Partnership in 2010, having been the recipient of additional funding released by the Deputy Prime Minister under the Literacy and Numeracy Partnership. The school has used this funding to support the implementation of intervention strategies to improve literacy and numeracy for targeted students across the school, and are already reaping the rewards.

<Geoff Gillman – Acting Principal, Humpty Doo Primary School>

Humpty Doo Primary School has greatly appreciated being involved in the Smarter Schools National Partnership. The program has enabled us to purchase new materials for use in the school and also to target professional learning around those materials. The program has also enabled us to strengthen our literacy and numeracy intervention programs such as QuickSmart, and also to employ an on-site literacy coach. One of the exciting things we’ve noticed from the program has been the wonderful increase over a fairly short period of time in the reading abilities of the students.

<Voiceover>

Humpty Doo Primary School’s participation in the Maximising Improvements in Literacy and Numeracy initiative has enabled the employment of an on-site literacy coach, to provide professional support and in-class coaching for teachers across the school. Additional materials to support this program, particularly in the early years, have ensured the students can access readers and other resources that will enhance their literacy learning.

<Barbara Doukas – Literacy Coach>

As a team, we collected data on all of the students within our school. We collected baseline data to see exactly where our students were at, and literacy was the target area. So we collaborated with the classroom teacher and looked at resources and programs that we could use in a small group situation that would also easily transfer into the classroom, and we then worked with the classroom teacher within their classrooms to develop those programs when the students came back into the room.

<Ali Brady – Teacher>

I got the support then of Barb, and the literacy – the other literacy coaches to work out approaches that would best suit individual students, then you’re just not doing it on your own and they get to see the students in a little bit of a different environment than I do in the class environment, so that both views can go towards getting the best individual learning plan for the kids.

<Barbara Doukas – Literacy Coach>

We withdraw students in groups of between four and six students at a time. The students are at similar levels and that enables us then to give intensive individual support to each student and helps to bolster their confidence so that when they then go back into the classroom they’re better able to handle the demands of the classroom.

<Geoff Gillman – Acting Principal, Humpty Doo Primary School>

In our school we use a lot of different data to look at progress of students. We use Northern Territory Curriculum Framework monitoring through the C e-Tool we use standardized reading assessments, we also use NAPLAN national assessment program data to assist us, but what also we found very useful is anecdotal data collected by teachers in their classrooms, and in particular looking at the confidence levels of students.

<Ali Brady – Teacher>

In terms of benefits the confidence that the children show by just having the smaller group opportunity with their learning, then coming back into a classroom, they’re much more confident to approach tasks and take a risk with their learning. Also improved reading outcomes (as in higher reading levels). What happens is as they go to higher reading levels this also works through to their writing and their spelling is also improved with all of this as well. The small groups also get the chance to work together, so there’s some collaborative learning going on there too.

<Barbara Doukas – Literacy Coach>

We have chosen to use additional online programs to support our reading program. One is the Reading Eggs computer-based program, the Lexile website, and the Sunshine e-Library, and we have students throughout the school who are using those programs depending on their level, and what program is best for them. We find these programs very successful.

<Geoff Gillman – Acting Principal, Humpty Doo Primary School>

The efforts that we put in through the program has exceeded what we expected. We’ve been thrilled with the results, the confidence in students, and also this has been shown with comments from parents as well, they’ve seen improvements in the home.

<Belinda Everett – Parent>

We sit down at night time – he’s got two younger brothers – and we all get a book, and we all sit down and read right before bed time, just to wind them down, and Nathan sits there and he reads his readers and chooses a book as well to read. I am so proud of him, I can’t put it into words because it’s just amazing to see my child grow the way he is.

<Voiceover>

Student achievement data collected from our reading program has also yielded significant increases, and improved confidence of students in their literacy. And this is often reflected in how students feel about engaging in the programs themselves.

<Nathan Everett – Literacy Student>

Reading when I – used to be a little bit hard and now it’s feeling easy to do it.

<Barbara Doukas – Literacy Coach>

It gives me a lot of encouragement as an educator, to see the gains that students are making in such a short amount of time. Really, these students only needed a little kick start, they just needed a little bit of intervention and then they were on their way and it’s very encouraging to see that these students are now willing to take more risks and become more lifelong learners.

<Geoff Gillman – Acting Principal, Humpty Doo Primary School>

Humpty Doo School hopes that the programs that have been established through the National Partnerships will continue. We’ve tried to put in structures and processes that will make the program sustainable over the next several years.